International interest for the tomb of Amphipolis

International interest for the tomb of Amphipolis

Most international news agencies made special reference to the excavations of Ancient Amphipolis, in northern Greece.

Athena Korlira
ΓΡΑΦΕΙ: ATHENA KORLIRA

Most international news agencies made special reference to the excavations of Ancient Amphipolis, in northern Greece.

“The tomb, in the country's north-eastern Macedonia region, which has been gradually unearthed over the past two years, marks a significant discovery from the early Hellenistic era”, the Guardian reports.

Prime Minister Antonis Samaras, accompanied by his wife Georgia and Culture Minister Constantinos Tassoulas, on Tuesday morning visited the excavation site of Ancient Amphipolis, in the northern Greek region of Serres.

“It marks a significant discovery from the early Hellenistic era, although a Culture Ministry official said there was no evidence yet to suggest a link to Alexander the Great, who died in 323 B.C. after an unprecedented military campaign through the Middle East, Asia and northeast Africa, or his family”, Reuters. It marks a significant discovery from the early Hellenistic era, although a Culture Ministry official said there was no evidence yet to suggest a link to Alexander the Great, who died in 323 B.C. after an unprecedented military campaign through the Middle East, Asia and northeast Africa, or his family, the report continues.

International interest for the tomb of Amphipolis

It is clear that we stand before an extremely important finding

Samaras then visited the Kasta Tomb and was guided through the excavation site by the archaeologist in charge Katerina Peristeri who briefed him on the findings.

“It is clear that we stand before an extremely important finding,” he said adding that the land of Macedonia continues revealing unique treasures that “weave the unique mosaic or our Greek history.”

“This is a monument with unique features: A surrounding peribolos of 497 meters, almost a perfect circle carved in Thassos marble. The Lion of Amphipolis over 5 meters high, 5.20 meters; let's imagine it as being on the top of the tomb," he said while also referring to the wide path that leads to the tomb entrance and the two Sphinxes that seem to be guarding it.

“I believe all these findings have allowed archaeologist Katerina Peristeri to be optimistic that this is a unique burial monument, which –as she said- dates between 325 and 300 BC. Regarding the key question, the excavation will reveal the identity of the deceased. The excavation will continue at a pace dictated by the finding as well as the scientific ethics,” he added congratulating Peristeri and her partners.

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